Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Swashbucklers Anonymous

My name is Christy Barongan and I am a swashbuckler.

I mentioned in a previous post that I'm reading The Art of Empathy in an attempt to help me with my hyperempath problem. I finished the chapter on empathic love, and it is so true of me that it freaked me out. I almost had a panic attack and had to take a nap afterwards.

In this chapter she lists 4 impediments in a potential mate: 1) a lack of emotional skills, 2) an active addiction, 3) unhealed childhood trauma, and 4) the presence of a toxic ex-mate. These impediments are practically criteria for a relationship for me. I like challenges, but come on! This is ridiculous! Reading this list drove home the fact that most my relationships had little chance of succeeding from the start.

Ironically, reading this chapter also helped me to not beat myself up about my relationship choices. I am drawn to people with these problems for the same reason that I chose to be a psychologist. I want to help people. I believe everyone is capable of turning their life around, and I am confident that I can help them do it. I never back down from a challenge, and I never give up. These are all qualities that I'm proud of.

However, I am beginning to realize that every challenge has a cost. Even if I do something I enjoy, like play tennis, write a blog post, or talk to my brother, it drains me mentally and physically. Which is OK. I love doing these things, so it's worth it. But in the past, having the ability to help someone was reason enough to do it. Whether I wanted to do it or not was irrelevant because my wants and needs didn't count. And I never paid attention to the impact that giving so much of myself had on my well-being.

In a way, that's one of the benefits of being prone to depression and anxiety and of having allergies, GERD, and asthma. Now I have to pay close attention to everything I do and how it will affect me. I have to be intentional about all of my choices. It's a pain, but it forces me to take care of myself.

Also, when I choose to do something challenging, most of the time I'm not too attached to the outcome--except in relationships. I'd like to move up to 4.0 in tennis, but if I don't, I'll just keep trying. Same with writing a best seller. I know the odds aren't in my favor, but I enjoy the process, and if it never happens I won't be devastated. I don't even take it personally when I can't help a client get better.

If I had the same attitude in relationships--that I gave my best effort, and that's all I can do--then perhaps I wouldn't feel like such a failure in them.

It also helps that McLaren calls people like me swashbucklers rather than codependents or love addicts. She describes swashbucklers as people on a heroic journey filled with impossible tasks and mythical beasts. Sort of like relationship warriors. But like Odysseus at the end of his adventures, I think I'm ready to come home.

Maybe I can use my superhero skills to save myself.  After all, who is better qualified to help me than me? I don't even have to do it alone. I could create a support group for hyperempaths. A 12 step program for swashbucklers, if you will. I think it could be a big hit.

So if you're interested in participating, let me know.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hey, why am I "exhausting"? Anyway, I can relate to defaulting to the hero mentality. McLaren's definition of swashbucklers sound a lot like Don Quixote & his quest to fight imaginary monsters. Perhaps there are times when we are guilty of the same.
---Rome

christy barongan said...

It's the whole superempath thing. I feel what other people feel. Helping others requires what my therapist calls an emotional transfusion.

Anonymous said...

That makes sense. Anyway, you wouldn't be the first person to call me "exhausting." Ha! I like the post.

christy barongan said...

You should join my support group.

K MARIA said...

Awesome blog.

christy barongan said...

Thanks K Maria!